The Art of Vegan Communication

I interviewed 5 vegan activists for advice on how to speak effectively about veganism.

“How do I speak about veganism?

I often receive messages for help like this. To be honest, I always feel underqualified and too inexperienced to answer. I too struggle to effectively speak about veganism with people sometimes.

So, I thought to myself “how do experienced activists talk about veganism?”

I reached out on social media to see if anybody would help me out and I decided on 5 activists. I sent each of them the same questionnaire. Below, I have compiled their responses in an attempt to provide you with a guide to more effective vegan communication. I hope it’s as helpful to you as it has been to me.

Content

(use the links to jump to each section)

Meet The Activists

Why Activism?

Types of Activism

Effective Communication with Friends and Family

Effective Communication with the Public

How to Deal with Jokes, Being Mocked and Arguments

Role of Social Media in Vegan Activism

Opinion on Controversial Activism

How to Get Involved with Vegan Activism

Best Resources for Learning About Veganism and Animal Rights

Raising Awareness


Meet The Activists 

Adam (@herbivore_club)

“I’m a very private individual and until recently, employed as a microbiologist. I now spend my professional and personal time advocating for animals 9–12 hours a day. In the remaining time, I spend with partner, children, and rescued animals. I am also a functional autistic and find my perspective and skills conducive to my activism.’

I went vegan in late 2016. I started with reductions and replacements for the environment around 2014. I have IBD and expected my condition would get worse with more plants but felt that the inevitable progression of my disease shouldn’t cost the Earth and everybody on it. My health improved dramatically. I started researching the health impacts of animal products and the benefits of plant-based diets, I transitioned to a fully plant-based diet by the end of 2015. I had never met a vegan until I started talking about the environmental and health impacts of animal products online. Once exposed to vegan arguments I could no longer ignore the logic, and I became a vegan activist pretty much straight away.”

Christopher ‘Soul’ Eubanks (@soul_eubanks)

“I was raised in Atlanta, Ga and enjoyed the arts as a child i.e. creating hip-hop music, drawing and learning film making. I worked in finance for 7 years before deciding to leave corporate America to become a freelance photographer/videographer. I was a vegetarian for almost a decade before becoming vegan because I wanted to have a healthier diet. As I began to educate myself on animal agriculture I felt the urge to become an activist and speak out against animal cruelty and have been doing so for over a year.

I became vegan after watching Cowspiracy. Once I became aware of how bad eating animal products were for the environment I decided to change my diet. After changing my diet I soon realized all of the suffering and injustice that happens to animals in animal agriculture and many more of heart breaking ways animals are exploited in other industries and used for consumption. This made me no longer want to contribute to the suffering of innocent beings and be more mindful in the choices I make with the products I consume.”

Katelyn O’brien (@bitter_vegan)

“I’m 27 years old, I grew up in a military family so I spent a huge portion of growing up living in Italy. I love love love animals, but my favourite is dogs! I volunteer and foster with a local bully breed rescue and split most of my free time between that, and volunteering for my local vegan association.

When I was around 11 years old, I watched a video from PETA of cows and chickens being slaughtered. I remember being shocked by the coldness and mechanization of the process. I remember watching some of the animals struggle after their throats were slit while they were hanging upside down, still alive. I went to my mom and was like, I’m not eating meat anymore. She also bought me soy milk instead of milk to be supportive and I never drank milk again. Once I went to college, veganism appeared on my radar, but it didn’t stay there. I still ate cheese and eggs from my parents’ chickens. After getting in deep on the internet, I discovered Earthlings, and I’m sad to say that I STILL ate cheese after that. I had this idea in my head that animals overseas weren’t treated as terribly as animals in the US. A Mercy for Animals (I think) video showing water buffalo in the very city that I lived in being abused led me to visit a water buffalo farm (because my parents would buy straight from the farm) where I saw the disgusting conditions of the animals, their open wounds, and the babies crying for their mothers. That’s when I started eating vegan at restaurants and at home but I don’t think I was really *vegan* until it clicked in my brain that animals and products derived from animals are NOT food, which was about three years ago.”

Danielle Morales (@danielle_xvx)

“I am nearly 20 years old. I was born and raised in southern California. I currently work two jobs and make room for activism whenever I can. I am very passionate about human and animal rights. I enjoy cooking and trying out new recipes, watching cooking tutorials, and sharing my food online or with my family and friends in person.

I went vegan January 1, 2019. I went vegan because I truly love animals. Before I went vegan, I was vegetarian for three months. I knew that I wanted to go vegan because I knew using them as commodities was wrong, but it wasn’t until a few months being vegan that I realized how truly awful the dairy industry is and how the dairy/egg industry is the meat industry. Going vegan I learned that there is a lot of human rights violations in this industry as well. I am vegan for the animals, exploited humans, the planet, and my health.”

Tina Gill (@tinalofo)

“I turned veggie when I was 6 because I loved animals, I stopped eating eggs at 10 but unfortunately didn’t find out about the horrors of the dairy industry until 4 years ago. That’s when I became vegan. I’ve been an activist for a year.

4 years ago. I was eating cheesy chips on the sofa, flicking through facebook when I saw a clip about the dairy industry. I ran upstairs, threw up and became vegan!”


Why Activism?

Adam 

‘‘The world is a dark place not because of those that do evil things, but because so many do nothing to stop them. It’s not enough to do not participate in abuse, the moral baseline is doing everything possible to end that abuse.’’

Christopher ‘Soul’ Eubanks

“After about a year of following a plant-based diet, I realized that being vegan was an ethical lifestyle choice and not just a diet.  As I became aware of the many ways animals were abused and exploited it wasn’t enough for me to not purchase these products I needed to speak out against animal suffering. I decided to take part in activism after watching youtube videos of activists such as Banana Warrior Princess, Earthling Ed, James Apsey and others have conversations with the public about veganism.”

Katelyn O’Brien

‘‘I worked at Starbucks for a while and one of my customers would always get nondairy and double check that her drink was vegan. I told her I was vegan too and when she and another woman in our community started an AV chapter, they asked me if I would be willing to take part and I thought why not? I honestly really joined because I thought it would be a good way to make friends, but the footage that we showed made me feel a sense of urgency that I had never felt before. I started to explore more for myself and I began seeing the hypocrisy in peoples’ actions, became angry at the meat pushing ads, felt hopeless at the apathy that I saw towards the treatment of animals and the environment. I had to do SOMETHING and activism helped with that. ’’

Danielle Morales 

‘‘My activism started when I was about 14 years old, and it was through raising awareness for victims of sexual abuse. I’ve always been a really passionate and empathetic person. I saw and read many things that I did not like and things that just did not sit right with me. These things made me angry and realized that these things weren’t going to change unless I did something about it. I couldn’t wait for someone to come around and do it for me. I read a quote that something along the lines of “if you choose to remain neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor,” and that will forever resonate with me.’’

Tina Gill 

‘‘I felt like being Vegan wasn’t enough. I wanted to do as much as I possibly could and just living a Vegan lifestyle wasn’t enough. I felt frustrated and angered by all the injustices happening to animals. I went to the animal rights march in London by myself (and met up with a girl from twitter). I saw the guys marching under the Anoymous for the Voiceless banner and I was desperate to get involved. When I got home I messaged all the local groups. My first cube was in Sheffield and there’s been no looking back.’’


Types Of Activism

Adam 

‘‘I am a chapter organiser for Anonymous for the Voiceless, the cube of truth demonstrations expose the reality of animal agriculture to the public and initiate positive Socratic communication with those willing to stop and talk. I visit several other chapters in the surrounding area. I am a Save Movement organiser of two locations, we highlight to the public facilities hiding animal abuse, film the animals, and say goodbye to them in the last moments before they are killed. I also get involved with protests and Earthlings experiences. I spend a tremendous amount of time online advocating for animals and assisting vegans new and old. More recently, I left my day job as a microbiologist to join an animal protection charity as their social media coordinator.’’

Christopher ‘Soul’ Eubanks 

“I have done a variety of activism from protest, boycotts and marches but the majority of my activism revolves around Anonymous for the Voiceless and the Save Movement as I am a co-organizer for both of their Atlanta chapters.”

Katelyn O’Brien

‘‘My local AV chapter does a monthly cube at a community event, in addition to some on the weekends. I have taken part in disruptions with our local DxE chapter and we graffiti a local landmark with vegan messages of peace and love (it’s totally legal). I helped compile a list of all of the vegan restaurants in my area and the vegan options at restaurants (eatveganpcola.com). I also protest when the rodeo and circus come to town, which is pretty frequently.’’

Danielle Morales 

“I do attend cubes if truth, but I mostly take part in vigils with LA Animal Save, Animal Alliance Network, and sometimes Chino Cow Save. A vigil is where animal activists will stand outside of slaughterhouses to give animals water or even a kind word and some comfort in an attempt to alleviate their suffering. We also take pictures and videos to show those who are not aware of the truth about these facilities. Where I am from, these vigils are held 3–4 times a week so they are frequent and convenient for me most of the time.”

Tina Gill 

“I do a lot of Cube of Truths with AV, earthlings and ditch dairy events. We do chalking and talking as well as leafleting. Recently a fellow activist and I have set up a new activist group called ‘Planet Healthy’ where, instead of focusing on animal agriculture, we focus on the health and environmental benefits of Veganism. This allows us to go into places where we otherwise would not be invited such as having stalls in supermarkets and shopping centres. We’ll also be setting up stalls at park runs and holding litter picks — all with a view to talking to people about Veganism.”


Effective Communication with Friends and Family

Adam 

“I generally avoid talking about veganism with friends and family. I will answer their questions but that is all.”

Christopher ‘Soul’ Eubanks 

“When we talk to anyone whether it be friends or family we should never put the pressure on ourselves to convince others to become vegan. Often we feel we have failed if someone doesn’t share our perspective or convert to veganism when we speak to them but when we have this mindset it prevents us from listening and having an honest conversation. The best thing to do when having conversations with anyone about veganism is to listen to others with an open mind without judgement since we want others to do the same. 

We can’t have effective conversations about compassion if we are angry and hostile so we have to make sure we focus on having a positive experience not only for the other person but for ourselves and most importantly the animals. Always remember you are using your voice to speak on behalf of the animals and if you use your voice negatively it doesn’t help the animals.”

Katelyn O’Brien 

“Almost all of my close friends are vegan. Some I would like to think that I had a part in converting because they weren’t vegan when I met them. I share relevant news stories to my social media that highlight the detrimental effect that animal agriculture has on the environment, to people’s health, and of course to the animals’ lives. It’s just a steady stream of information that they have to see because they won’t unfriend me. If someone says they feel sick after they eat dairy, I will emphasize it. If they think an animal is cute, I say, “I don’t know how people can eat them.” I invite them to all of the vegan community events. I remain consistent in my ethics and my actions. It’s really difficult to talk to my family about it because they are very very defensive. I honestly haven’t found an effective way to talk to my family about veganism.”

Danielle Morales 

“Luckily my non-vegan family and friends have always been really supportive and receptive, but being the only vegan in the family can be challenging. I usually don’t bring it up first, but when they do ask me questions I just try to educate them to the best of my ability. This is usually when we are out to eat or at the dinner table. I will let them know about things that I have read and even things that I have seen with my own eyes because I have seen a lot. I just try to have a civil conversation, and always speak from my heart. It is important to speak with conviction. It is important to know why you are doing something and really believe in it.”

Tina Gill 

“This is always the most difficult part. I’d honestly recommend getting a third party to talk to them. At a cube the other week I spoke to a woman who was veggie and her partner who was a carnist. She said to me “I’ve been trying for years, he won’t change”. 20 minutes later both of them went away trying veganism.”


Effective Communication with the Public

Adam 

“I use the Socratic method to ask questions about their thoughts and feelings on the issues, this gets them engaged with the subject without feeling like they’re being told what to think or believe. Most often our values are the same, it’s just they’ve never considered how their habits are contradicting their own values.”

Christopher ‘Soul’ Eubanks 

“I approach the general public the same way as I approach anyone when I speak to about veganism, I use the Socratic Method and listen to them and try to have a healthy conversation. Sure when I speak to friends and family I’m a bit looser and a bit less cautious since I have a personal relationship with them but my overall approach is to respectfully listen but be unapologetic in my stance.”

Katelyn O’Brien

“I think it’s important to keep in mind that most people would not willingly take part in animal cruelty. That’s why people close their eyes, refuse to watch the footage, etc. You can see it now with the Fairlife investigation. People know that what is happening to the animals is wrong, but they are happy living in their make-believe land where killing an animal just to eat their dead body, isn’t animal abuse but punching the animal before you slit their throat is. I know a lot of people go plant-based for their health or for the environment, but what makes people stay vegan, is when they are doing it for the animals. So I try to humanize animals, emphasize how they are just like us (even though that shouldn’t be criteria for not eating them), and how they are being bred into existence for the sole purpose of human consumption.”

Danielle Morales

“My approach to the general public about veganism is pretty similar to my approach with family and friends. I personally think that when talking to the public about veganism, what you say shouldn’t be straight up facts. When you state mostly facts, something that should be a conversation, then turns into a debate or argument. When debating or arguing it is easy to get frustrated. You shouldn’t feel as if you won or not, because it is better to have a conversation. That’s all it really is. The goal is to educate people about the animal agriculture industry and see if people will give veganism a try, not to win an argument. I like to get more in touch with emotions. I believe that empathy, compassion, and understanding are muscles within all of us.”

Tina Gill

“This depends on the event but always approach them respectfully. Find out which area they care about- animals, environment, health, human rights, religion- and focus on that. If they say they wouldn’t consider veganism, don’t just leave it there. Say to them “so what is it that would stop you?”. Find out their reasons so you’re not wasting valuable time banging on about something they don’t care about and make it specific to them. E.g “I care more about human rights” Response “Ok, absolutely, I get that and Veganism is also about human rights from many perspectives. Think about this- would you ever want to work in a slaughter house? No? What if you were desperate and had to feed your family? Well, that’s who work in the majority of slaughterhouses, them and low paid immigrant workers. Many of these guys suffer from PTSD etc. Can you imagine if a pig just nuzzled your hand then the next minute you’re slitting their throat or putting them in a gas chamber, what do you thing you’ll see as you close your eyes at night?” Another one I use for human rights is “people are starving yet we are using all that food to feed 56 billion animals that we are going to kill to eat when we could just feed those crops to people”.”


How to Deal with Jokes, Being Mocked and Arguments

Adam 

“What has always served me well was knowing the facts and arguments so that I’m able to calmly turn those attacks around and be the better person for not stooping low.”

Christopher ‘Soul’ Eubanks 

“My advice to someone new to veganism is to make vegan friends and establish a support group so if you ever get this negativity it doesn’t bother you as much because you have people you can reach out to who share the same lifestyle. This can be done by joining Facebook groups, meetups, Twitter, Reddit groups, etc… This is important because as vegans we are a minority and being vegan can be lonely if we don’t know other vegans since the world normalizes animal suffering.”

Katelyn O’Brien

“I should honestly take my own advice, but you can’t let it get to you. When I first started out, I responded to every troll, was rude to every person who was rude to me, and it’s just not sustainable. You will get burned out and just get consumed by the negative energy. Not everyone will be receptive to your message, but some people will. At a Cube of Truth, an outreacher can spend 30 minutes talking to someone who has every excuse in the book, or they can have meaningful conversations with 5 different people. I am constantly mocked by my coworkers, and I usually just roll my eyes and move on. Some of them are a little more open minded, so I will pose a question that might make them think like, “Why would you eat animals if you don’t have to?” or “Isn’t killing something and then eating their dead body the ultimate form of abuse?”

Danielle Morales

“This is such an “easier said than done,” thing, but you have to stop caring. I definitely faced this, I think everyone does actually, but I never cared. Going back to conviction, I knew why I went vegan and I believed in what I was doing, so these jokes never mattered to me. Sometimes I’ll even play along.”

Tina Gill 

“It takes a hell of a lot more strength to stand against the norm. People are scared of something that they don’t understand, that changes the equilibrium and that’s why they mock. There is more strength in compassion and kindness than blindly following what everyone else is doing. Tell them to watch “Dominion”. Let’s see if they are mocking then.”


Role of Social Media in Vegan Activism

Adam 

“Social media has tremendous power to spread awareness to millions of people with a cost of only time and creativity. In the past people have relied on traditional media sources which are still largely complicit with hiding the truth from the public, social media gives power to people to share what would not otherwise be spread.”

I’m a huge fan of Adam’s relentless “Vegans Will Never Change Anything” posts on Twitter.

Christopher ‘Soul’ Eubanks 

“Social media plays a large role in animal activism and may even rival offline activism in how much of an impact it makes. If it weren’t for social media I’m almost certain I wouldn’t be an activist. I was able to study and learn from so many other activists before I even began doing activism by following them on social media. Social media is effective not only in moulding activists but it can also be used to spread awareness about animal suffering to audiences that offline activism could never achieve.”

Katelyn O’Brien 

“I think it plays a huge role! You can see it when people reach out for help on Twitter, and with the dissemination of the Fairlife ARM video. Without social media, how many people would it have reached? Additionally, social media is a great resource for morale. It’s so easy to feel alone and like you are the only person who cares. With social media, you are able to connect with people all over the world who feel the same way that you do. I’ve learned so much from the vegan twitter community and I pass it on to my local vegan community. I’ve met people from vegan twitter in real life through activism and it is just so vindicating to not feel alone.”

Danielle Morales 

“I think social media plays a very important role in vegan and animal activism. Had it not been for activists sharing videos and pictures from documentaries etc., I probably would not be vegan. I have even had multiple people tell me that because of the pictures and videos that I post from vigils, made them want to steer towards a vegan lifestyle. I was also once interviewed before and featured on their social media by a band called Stick to Your guns about my role in activism, and I have a few fellow fans say that they are glad they shared my profile because it inspired them too. When used properly, social media is such a powerful way to share things and plant seeds.”\

Tina Gill 

“I think its massively important and a good way to get the message out there. It’s why I turned vegan. I don’t, however, think it is a substitute for street activism. We need more people to get involved in actual street activism, talking to people on a 1 on 1 basis.”


Opinion on Controversial Activism

Adam 

“While I do not participate in these kinds of activism, these actions are incredibly valuable in getting the public talking about veganism and animal suffering. For every “extreme” act of civil disobedience, which has been crucial to every justice movement, the frame of what is publicly acceptable activism is moved towards more impactful actions. An example would be PETA fighting against the captivity of Dolphins and whales decades ago, extreme views at the time, pretty much accepted by all now. These “extreme” actions make more moderate activists seem sensible to the public.”

Christopher ‘Soul’ Eubanks

“Although I would never prevent any form of activism from fighting for animal liberation I’m not a fan of disruptions. I don’t know if they are truly effective and I think sometimes they can come across as vegans being elitist. But with that said I do support organizations such as DXE and other disruptions even if I don’t engage in these acts myself. “

Katelyn O’Brien 

“As a former food service and retail worker, I don’t appreciate that the employees of McDonalds have to clean up the fake blood and mess. We are protesting the system, not the employees, and we know that the CEO of McDonalds is not going to be out there cleaning it up. With that being said, I support all activism. Different people will be reached in different ways. The fact that this action was all over the news, means that it reached a very large audience, causing who knows how many people to question their actions.

I am a firm believer that activists shouldn’t criticize other activists. If you have a problem with what they are doing, you should reach out to them in private. Many actions are supposed to make people feel uncomfortable in order to propel social change. I took part in a local action that was all over the local news and went viral by our community’s standards. The amount of vegans that I personally knew saying that we were crazy or that we didn’t accomplish anything was very very disheartening and definitely hurt morale. Especially because we had many people reach out afterwards curious about veganism (including one of the police officers that was called to the scene by the management of the restaurant).

In my opinion, it does nothing for the movement to trash talk activists. Yes, you can have a debate or discussion on the efficacy of certain approaches, but I think it’s very important to remember that different approaches work for different people. You can see that with the recent DxE/Kamala Harris action. I read a lot of opinions about that action that offered constructive criticism and another viewpoint without completely degrading what they set out to do. Conducting your activism on social media is valid, organizing socials is valid, sharing vegan recipes is valid. If we keep our focus on the animals, then I think we can accomplish anything.”

Danielle Morales 

“It is my personal opinion that disturbances or disruptions are not an effective form of activism. I don’t think I have ever seen or heard someone say “I went vegan because I saw someone pour fake blood on themselves in McDonalds.” I feel like those are kind of things that make people want to mock vegans.”

Tina Gill 

“I think a Direct Action is a fantastic group who are very brave. The media always manages to twist the headlines to put vegans in a bad light but at least it is getting attention.”


How to Get Involved with Vegan Activism

Adam 

“I initially found it difficult to get involved due to the secrecy involved in such demonstrations. I would encourage new activists to find their local anonymous for the Voiceless group, attend vegan social events, and look at action groups supported by animal charities. Once you meet some other activists you can easily find out about other actions in your area.”

Christopher ‘Soul’ Eubanks 

“I would say reaching out to The Humane League that is closest to you is a great way to begin getting involved with demonstrations. This is a great way to meet activists that are involved with demonstrations. Also, PETA has great resources to assist new activist and can guide you in being involved with demonstrations, they even have free supplies you can order i.e. posters, banners, leaflets that you can use at demonstrations. Both organizations are great for activists who want to be involved with demonstrations and from there you can learn about more groups that do activism such as Anonymous for the Voiceless, The Save Movement, Direct Action Everywhere and see what form of activism suits your personality.”

Katelyn O’Brien 

“To find your local AV chapter, just go to this link. If there isn’t one, start one! My friend Jessie (@sassyveganism) just started one for Memphis and can give you some info on the process if you are interested. Join your local vegan Facebook groups and Vegan Activists Worldwide. People are always looking for activists to simply write their congressman, or call a city council or send an email! There is so much that you can do! If there is a circus or a rodeo coming to town, you can reach out to PETA (even though I know everyone hates them) and they will send you free signs or you can make your own. Just stand there with your signs and make people think! Maybe you can spark their conscience before they settle into blissful ignorance. Hosting a Dominon screening is also a really good way to help further the cause.”

Danielle Morales

“If you know someone that is active, don’t hesitate to ask them. We are all in this for the animals, so I’m sure anybody would be happy to let you know how. Maybe even google it. I personally got involved because I knew someone that was vegan and does lots of activism. The save movement on instagram is also a great thing to look into.”

Tina Gill 

“Contact your local AV group, you can find them on Facebook or through their webpage. Search for activist groups in your area on Facebook or post in vegan groups to see if anyone can point you in the right direction. Once you go to one event you’ll start mixing with others and more events get noticed. We are always looking for new organisers at Planet Healthy, so if health and environment are of interest, message us on Facebook.”


Best Resources for Learning About Veganism and Animal Rights

Adam 

1. Veganuary

2. Beyond Carnism a book by Melanie Joy.

3. FreeFromHarm

Christopher ‘Soul’ Eubanks 

AnonymousfortheVoiceless.org

TheHumaneLeague.org

PETA.org

DirectActionEverywhere.com

TheNard.org

TheSaveMovement.org

Animalliberationconference.com

Arconference.org

Katelyn O’brien 

“I really love this site SacredScribble. They have a lot of good ideas and sell cute stencils that you can use in chalktivism! Social media is honestly the best resource in my opinion. You can ask a question to people all over the world and get answers back in five minutes.”

Danielle Morales

“I think documentaries like earthlings, dominion, and cowspiracy are very powerful. If you need help transitioning diet wise, challenge22.com is excellent! When you sign up you will get recipes, tips, videos, and so much more!”

Tina Gill 

“Facebook, Land of Hope and Glory website, Anonymous for the Voiceless website.”


Raising Awareness

Adam 

“I’m currently running a fundraiser to provide fencing for Beneath the Wood Sanctuary in Wales. 8 pigs once destined for slaughter are now set to find a safe home there once the fences are built. We only have until September.”

Help Adam out by donating to the fundraiser here.

Christopher ‘Soul’ Eubanks 

“In the fall the VegFest will be in Atlanta and local activists along with myself are planning to have Atlanta’s first Animal Rights March as a part of the Nov 9th & 10th weekend. For more information about any vegan or animal rights activities that I continue to be a part of you can follow me on all social media’s at @Soul_Eubanks or you can visit my website at SoulEubanks.com.”

Katelyn O’Brien 

“I am really passionate about ending agricultural subsidies in the United States. The US has a 1.4 billion pound stockpile of cheese that it can’t even give away. Meanwhile, the USDA facilitates the dispersion of dairy products to children, low-income individuals, and fast food companies. For every $1 of producer returns that dairy farmers earned in 2015, 73 cents came from the US government, aka our tax dollars. We just awarded 16 billion dollars of bailout money to agriculture. As vegans, we pride ourselves on not spending money on things that hurt animals, but whether we like it or not, our government is essentially wiping our actions clean and paying the farmers anyways.

I see links celebrating the profits of the dairy farmers falling, but they are still getting paid, by us. Not only is it harmful for the animals, but 65% of the people on this planet are not able to digest lactose. Dairy is making people sick, but it’s mandatory for children to have a carton of milk with their school lunch. My good friend works at a school and even if the kids are allergic, they still have to get a carton and then throw it away. Who is this benefiting? Not Americans. Not cows. Not the environment. I recently joined the Vegan Justice League, which hires lobbyists to work against big ag subsidies. You can follow them on Twitter, on Instagram, and on Facebook. I think that this is a practical approach that we as a movement need to be looking at in the United States. Also please spay and neuter your pets!”

Danielle Morales 

“I don’t have any specific project, but you can follow me on Instagram to learn more about the activism that I do and how to get involved first hand. My DMs are always open for advice or questions about a vegan lifestyle and any sort of activism.”

Tina Gill 

“There is a different type of activism that can suit just about everyone and we really need people to get involved. We are always looking for new organisers at Planet Healthy so if health and environment are of interest, message us on Facebook and/or sign up to your local AV chapter. Veganism is always the goal, not baby steps, not meatless Mondays and not vegetarianism.”

Andrew Miles (@memanmevegan)

I really hope this article was insightful for you. I hope it has given you some ideas on how to better communicate with people about veganism and also how to get involved in activism if you wish to.

Personally, I love to watch videos from Earthling Ed. I think he has a fantastic way with words and an amazing ability to really get people thinking. Here are some of the favourite videos of his for you to check out: